Deep Fakes - and why you should care

Deep Fakes - and why you should care

How do you know whether a video is true? An image? Did what it portrays really happen? Read this mind-blowing short blog on why we musn't trust videos and images as a snapshot of history ...

At the Global Governance of AI Roundtable event earlier this year, I was in a workshop called “Horizon Scanning”. I was way out of my depth sitting with a group of mainly tech developers and engineers who speak a language other than, and different from, my own.

What they were discussing was the digital innovations and developments that are on the horizon, and what they will mean for society at large.

Their discussions made me shudder. Not because the people were evil, or carefree, or necessarily in favour of these digital technologies, but more because they all agreed: “We can’t stop it, like it or not, only a global regulation will stop someone, somewhere developing these things”

We are moving from images and videos being an account of ‘what was’, to be an account of what ‘is desired

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Deep Fakes

One of the things they discussed is Deep Fakes: computer generated pictures, texts, and videos. Made so convincingly that no one will know that they are not real, but are a lie, a manipulation. As the chair of the workshop dryly stated:

“We are moving from images and videos being an account of ‘what was’, to be an account of what ‘is desired’”

I will leave that comment hanging there for a while together with this heading from the Guardian: Deep fakes are where truth goes to die.

If you aren’t spooked yet, watch this short video